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Proto-states often reference either or both doctrines in order to legitimise their claims to statehood.There are, for example, entities which meet the declarative criteria (with de facto partial or complete control over their claimed territory, a government and a permanent population), but whose statehood is not recognised by any other states.A total of 56 states, including Germany, The People's Republic of China (PRC), proclaimed in 1949, is the more widely recognised of the two claimant governments of "China", the other being the Republic of China (ROC, also known as Taiwan).The PRC does not accept diplomatic relations with states that recognise the ROC (19 UN members and the Holy See as of 13 June 2017).Most of these states do not officially recognise the PRC as a state, though some states have established relations with the ROC while stating they do not intend to stop recognising the PRC (Kiribati, Nauru).Today the PLC (Palestinian Legislative Council) executes the government functions in all Palestinian territories outside of Israeli military-controlled zones.

Historical cases in this sense can be seen in Japanese-led Manchukuo or the German-created Slovak Republic and Independent State of Croatia before and during World War II. Turkey, the European Court of Human Rights judged Turkey for having exercised authority in the territory of Northern Cyprus.

Entities that are recognised by only a minority of the world's states usually reference the declarative doctrine to legitimise their claims.

In many situations, international non-recognition is influenced by the presence of a foreign military force in the territory of the contested entity, making the description of the country's de facto status problematic.

The Sovereign Military Order of Malta is currently in this position.

See list of governments in exile for unrecognised governments without control over the territory claimed.

There are also entities which do not have control over any territory or do not unequivocally meet the declarative criteria for statehood but have been recognised to exist de jure as sovereign entities by at least one other state.

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