Consolidating district illinois in school 1 0n 1 chat

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All of that is before you even begin to factor in such things as “sense of community” or physical safety which can be difficult to quantify, but that we know are greatly enhanced in smaller schools.

Parental involvement is much greater for smaller schools than for larger schools.

Many communities will fight to maintain local control over their schools, and will resent any effort to remove or weaken their influence on their children’s education.

Even if there are many administrators who make more than the Governor, they will not be the only layoffs to occur as a result of consolidation.

Quinn has stated that there are 270 school superintendents who make salaries higher than that of the Governor. Governor Sheila Simon in charge of this effort, due to her experience as an educator and concern for the school system.

Illinois Senate President John Cullerton is on record as favoring the addition of incentives to sweeten the deal for local districts that are merging.

There are several reasons for this: empirical studies of consolidation employ different analytical approaches to data; older data in some studies yield results that may not be representative of current district conditions; studies do not uniformly separate costs related to merging only a narrow range of district services from costs related to merging entire districts or combining schools; different studies focus on different costs or estimate costs in different ways; and much of the literature consists of advocacy.

The evidence detailed in this brief suggests that “a century of consolidation has already produced most of the efficiencies obtainable” and that poor regions benefit from smaller schools and districts.This factor is picked up on by children who value education higher when they see their parents taking a personal interest in it.The attendance rates of smaller schools are higher than the larger schools, attesting to the sense of community felt by students of the smaller schools.Governor Quinn has proposed lowering the transportation budget for the districts at the same time that students will have to travel longer distances to get to their classes.These costs will continue to rise as the cost of gasoline rises, which seems likely to continue over the long term.The economic impact to local communities from this lost revenue is another blow to economies already hard hit.

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