How to stop dating violence

6854933580_2c8b688306_z

Boston Public Health Commission Executive Director Barbara Ferrer talks to “48 Hours” about what parents need to know about teen dating abuse, the impact of social media, and the importance of healthy dating relationships. “Everybody’s electronically communicating about it. And what it tends to do is exacerbate the entirety of the situation.Social media has “added a level of stress that, we, as adults, haven’t had to deal with and we really need to make sure that young people understand that and set boundaries around their digital lives,” said Ferrer. Brittny Henderson of Burlington Wis., came face-to face with dating abuse her freshmen year in high school.Choose focuses on preventing dating abuse by educating 11- 14-year-olds about healthy relationships.The Lauren Dunne Astley Memorial Fund was created by her parents.Whether you are a student working on a school project about teen dating violence - or a parent looking for a way to talk with your teen about the difference between healthy and unhealthy behavior in a relationship - or a teacher working on a lesson plan for your health students, there are many free resources to help you #stop TDV including roleplaying activities, printable posters, and video games.Breakup violence among teens is a crime that has no zip code. A relationship ends and what happens is an emotional surge of uncontrollable anger.The nature of dating violence can be physical, emotional, or sexual, and includes stalking.The good news is, it doesn’t have to happen at all.

Futures Without Violence has led the way and set the pace for ground-breaking education programs, national policy development, professional training programs, and public actions designed to end violence against women, children and families around the world.It can be verbal or physical and sometimes, as in the case of Wayland, Mass., teen Lauren Astley, it can end in death. Researchers estimate that one in three young adults between the ages of 14 and 20 has experienced some form of dating violence.“Of teenagers who are in abusive relationships, 3 percent will tell an authority figure, 6 percent will tell a family member, but 75 percent will tell a friend - that’s why we focus on kids,” former Middlesex County, Mass., District Attorney Gerry Leone tells “48 Hours”.In a recent national survey, nearly 10 percent of high school students reported physical violence and 11 percent reported that they experienced sexual violence from a dating partner in the 12 months before the survey.Teens who are victims in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college and throughout their lifetimes.Victims of teen dating violence are more likely to experience symptoms of depression and anxiety.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!